‘When the men were off somewhere, he would come visiting their wives more solicitously than any priest they’d had before . . .’

‘O let them be left, wildness and wet . . .’

‘Into two I’ll slice the hair-seat of Helga’s kiss-gulper . . .’

‘People begin to see that something more goes to the composition of a fine murder than two blockheads to kill and be killed – a knife – a purse – and a dark lane . . .’

‘We must learn to love, learn to be kind, and this from earliest youth . . . Likewise, hatred must be learned and nurtured, if one wishes to become a proficient hater.’

‘You shall have thousands of gold pieces; – thousands of thousands – millions – mountains, of gold: where will you keep them?’

‘. . . revealing great shining fangs more than three inches long.’

‘. . . a most delicious, nourishing, and wholesome food . . .’

‘Can I bear to leave these blue hills?’

‘All nations, colors, barbarisms, civilizations, languages . . .’

‘It is a most wonderful comfort to sit alone beneath a lamp, book spread before you, and commune with someone from the past whom you have never met.’

‘Better mad with the crowd than sane all alone . . .’

‘Hoodwinked with faery fancy . . .’

‘Woman much missed, how you call to me, call to me . . .’

‘They trailed in all their vulgar glory over the fresh green grass . . .’

‘You will hear it for yourselves, and it will surely fill you with wonder.’

‘Because of his baldness and hairiness, he announced that it was a capital offence for anyone either to look down on him as he passed or to mention goats in any context.’

‘The Argonauts were terrified at the sight. But Jason planting his feet apart stood to receive them, as a reef in the sea confronts the tossing billows in a gale.’

‘Is it me you love, friend? or the race that made me?’

‘The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains.’

‘I blush to say what happened next.’

‘The devil gave the woman a nudge: “Look at that belt full of money peeping out from under the butcher’s shirt!” ’

‘There sat the dog with eyes as big as mill wheels.’

‘Mind you, it was a pukka, respectable opium-house, and not one of those stifling, sweltering chandoo-khanas that you can find all over the City.’

‘I truly thought I’d never make it back.’

‘. . . a good bit of spice to give the critlings a flavour, and plenty of treacle to make the mince-meat look rich.’

‘A glass of wine, a lover lovely as
The moon . . .’

‘Those husbands that I had, Three of them were good and two were bad. The three that I call “good” were rich and old.’

‘No one characteristic clasps us purely and universally in its embrace.’

‘. . . dreaming of bears, or fire, or water . . .’

‘Presently I heard a slight groan, and I knew it was a groan of mortal terror . . . the low stifled sound that arises from the bottom of the soul . . .’

‘While engaged on this hunt I felt the earth quiver under my feet, and heard a soft big soughing sound, and looking round saw I had dropped in on a hippo banquet’

‘She has many rare and charming qualities, but Sobriety is not one of them . . .’

“Oh, good God,” he kept saying with great relish. “Good God . . .” ’

‘Ye Ice-falls! ye that from the mountain’s brow
Adown enormous ravines slope amain – . . .’

‘I can promise to be candid, not, however, to be impartial.’

‘Desperate-minded villain!’

‘No voice, no low, no howl is heard; the chief sound of life here is a hiss.’

‘Even in the stillness of that dead-cold weather, I had heard no sound of little battering hands upon the window-glass . . .’

‘He gave orders that they were not to get any hot glum pudding in flames, for fear the spirits in their innards might catch fire . . .’

‘This is as much a mystery as the Immaculate Conception, which of itself must make a doctor an unbeliever.’

‘The color is hideous enough, and unreliable enough, and infuriating enough, but the pattern is torturing . . .’

‘All those excessive, useless regrets . . .’

‘I could see that she was still terribly afraid, but I didn’t soften anything; instead, seeing that she was afraid I deliberately intensified it.’

‘She decided she would teach him to speak and he was very soon able to say, “Pretty boy!”, “Your servant, sir!” and “Hail Mary!” ’

‘Strangely enough, I mistook it for a gentleman at first. Fortunately I had my spectacles with me so I could see it was really a nose.’

‘With one’s face in the wind you were almost burned with a shower of Firedrops . . .’

‘If marriage was the slow life-long acquittal of a debt contracted in ignorance, then marriage was a crime against human nature.’

‘Did she know and if she knew would she speak?’

‘Tonight he noticed how the women’s eyes
Passed from him to the strong men that were whole.’

‘They wanted me to give a concert; I wanted them to beg me. And so they did. I gave a concert.’

‘. . . I’ll stop doing it as soon as I understand what I’m doing.’

‘She kissed and kissed her with a hungry mouth.’

‘The valley was full of snakes and serpents as big as palm trees, so huge that they could have swallowed any elephant that met them . . .’

‘It’s a dreadful thing to yield . . . but resist now? Lay my pride bare to the blows of ruin? That’s dreadful too.’

‘Ah, what is the life of a human being – a drop of dew, a flash of lightning? This is so sad, so sad.’

‘If I stopped now, after coming all this way – well, they’d call me an idiot!’

‘. . . in this painting of Leonardo’s there was a smile so pleasing that it seemed divine rather than human . . .’

‘He was not blind to the fact that murder, like the religions of the Pagan world, requires a victim as well as a priest.’

‘Our passion was so great. Will the Old Man understand and help us once again?’

‘An ass, clothed in the skin of a lion . . .’

‘Wake, butterfly –’

‘. . . ever-present, phantom thing; My slave, my comrade, and my king’

‘It was as if the sea, breaking down the wall protecting all the homes of the town, had sent a wave over her head . . .’

‘Their fruits be diverse and plentiful, as nutmegs, ginger, long pepper, lemons, cucumbers, cocos, sago, with divers other sorts . . .’

‘At night, among the reeds on the bayou, Chicot could still hear the woman’s wail, mingled now with the croaking of the frogs.’

‘The vessel drove before her bows two billows of liquid phosphorus . . .’

‘Then she began to run, and she ran over the sharp stones and through the thorns, and the wild animals bounded past her . . .’

‘I hate and I love. And if you ask me how, I do not know: I only feel it, and I’m torn in two.’

‘You must be Odysseus, man of twists and turns . . .’

‘But I ran up the broken stairway, and came out suddenly, as by a miracle, clean on the platform of my San Tommaso, in the tremendous sunshine.’

‘And again, as always, he had the feeling he was holding something that never was quite his – his. Something too delicate, too precious, that would fly away once he let go.’

‘Drawn on by his eagerness for the open sky, he left his guide and soared upwards . . .’

‘Yes, we did many things, then  all
Beautiful . . .’

‘No, no, I’ve got your word for it, I’ve got to die . . . you promised me . . . you told me . . .’

‘But I, while vineyards ring with the cicadas’ scream, Retrace your steps, alone, beneath the burning sun.’

‘I will go in, out of this dust and heat, out of this dry glitter of vanity, out of these toilsome futilities. I will go and never return.’

‘Do you see your son, standing over there, in the antechamber? Well, I am going to shoot him.’

‘To the utterly at-one with Śiva there’s no dawn . . .’

‘For hate is not conquered by hate: hate is conquered by love. This is a law eternal.’

‘Of what a mistake were you guilty in marrying a Man of his age!—just old enough to be formal, ungovernable and to have the Gout—too old to be agreable, and too young to die.’

‘No true Democracy has ever existed, nor ever will exist.’

‘The pleasure is twice as sweet
When you cheat a cheat.’

‘. . . slowly uncoiling their tentacles . . . and making a soft purring sound to each other’

‘We have nothing left in the world but what we can win with our swords.’

‘The monstrous thought came into my mind as I perused the fixed eyes and the saturnine face, that this was a spirit, not a man.’

‘It is only a bruise.’

‘PALE TERROR GOES BEFORE HIM, DEATH AND DEVASTATION FOLLOW AFTER!’

‘How can the bird that is born for joy
Sit in a cage and sing?’

‘A ghastly groan and a shudder . . .’

“She’s an adventuress. Yes, an adventuress, but an end-of-the-century one. She doesn’t travel for profit, but for pleasure.” ’

‘Surely this is a new refinement in cruelty . . .’

‘I took the pistols, scarcely knowing what I did or believing what I heard, while Dupin went on, very much as if in a soliloquy.’

‘Once they are aroused, once they are determined, nothing on earth and nothing in heaven will make women give way; it is impossible.’

‘And then he, completely astonished at her words, left off his lewdness, saying to her as many a man had done before, “Either you are a truly good woman or else a truly wicked woman.” ’

‘She’s done for . . .’

“You are not my first passion, my divine friend, but you shall be my last.” ’

‘But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams under your feet . . .’

‘She bared her poor curst arm’

‘You elegant fowl!’

‘Ko-ax, ko-ax, ko-ax!
Now listen, you musical twerps,
I don’t give a damn for your burps!’

‘Why do I know a few more things? Why am I so clever altogether?’

‘What matters is to live everything. Live the questions for now.’

‘It was like walking along the knife-edge of the highest possible mountain range, seeing life on one side and death on the other in the form of two deep, gorgeous and gleaming seascapes.’

‘We are bought and sold like apes or monkeys, to be the sport of women, fools, and cowards, and the support of rogues . . .’

‘I cried, “Come, tell me how you live!”
And thumped him on the head.’

‘Let others in the jolting Coach confide, Or in the leaky Boat the Thames divide’

“Strange man, how can you have eyes for sale? Eyes? Eyes?” ’

‘Happiness beyond all words! A life of peace and love, entire and whole!’

‘Hermann waited for the appointed hour like a tiger trembling for its prey.’

‘I did have hallucinations, but did they harm anyone? Who did they harm, that’s what I’d like to know!’

‘Meanwhile, let us have a sip of tea. The afternoon glow is brightening the bamboos, the fountains are bubbling with delight, the soughing of the pines is heard in our kettle.’

‘And when I shall die,
Take him and cut him out in little stars.’

‘It’s coming — the postponeless Creature’

‘This only they knew, that the kiss had destroyed him and the bath had destroyed her.’

‘I gained his secret and we were both lost for ever’

‘Why did she stand before me with the candle in her hand, with her cruel contemptuous eyes fixed on me, and the glittering serpent, like a familiar demon, on her breast?’

‘My God! A whole minute of bliss! Is that really so little for the whole of a man’s life?’

‘It would be unfair to expect other people to be as remarkable as oneself’

‘Things are not simple but complex. If he bit Mr. Browning he bit her too. Hatred is not hatred; hatred is also love.’

‘. . . that strange internal kingdom of which we are the hapless and helpless monarchs.’

‘Idleness is the enemy of the soul’

‘I’m not myself – I’m somebody else – that’s me yonder – no – that’s somebody else got into my shoes . . . I can’t tell what’s my name, or who I am!’

‘It’s you who are the dogs . . .’

‘Brave Frenchmen, will you not surrender?’ Cambronne answered, ‘Merde!

‘Reader, if you’re ready, so am I.’

Giovanni Boccaccio
01
Mrs Rosie and the Priest
Giovanni
Boccaccio
PenguinClassics
Mrs Rosie
and
the Priest
Nº 01
Gerard Manley Hopkins
02
As kingfishers catch fire
Gerard
Manley Hopkins
PenguinClassics
As kingfishers
catch fire
Nº 02
Anon
03
The Saga of Gunnlaug Serpent-tongue
PenguinClassics
The Saga of
Gunnlaug
Serpent-tongue
Nº 03
Thomas De Quincey
04
On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts
Thomas
De Quincey
PenguinClassics
On Murder
Considered as
One of the
Fine Arts
Nº 04
Friedrich Nietzsche
05
Aphorisms on Love and Hate
Friedrich
Nietzsche
PenguinClassics
Aphorisms
on Love
and Hate
Nº 05
John Ruskin
06
Traffic
John Ruskin
PenguinClassics
Traffic
Nº 06
Pu Songling
07
Wailing Ghosts
Pu Songling
PenguinClassics
Wailing
Ghosts
Nº 07
Jonathan Swift
08
A Modest Proposal
Jonathan
Swift
PenguinClassics
A Modest
Proposal
Nº 08
Anon
09
Three Tang Dynasty Poets
PenguinClassics
Three
Tang Dynasty Poets
Nº 09
Walt Whitman
10
On the Beach at Night Alone
Walt
Whitman
PenguinClassics
On the Beach
at Night
Alone
Nº 10
Kenko
11
A Cup of Sake Beneath the Cherry Trees
Kenko
PenguinClassics
A Cup of Sake
Beneath the
Cherry Trees
Nº 11
Baltasar Gracián
12
How to Use Your Enemies
Baltasar
Gracián
PenguinClassics
How to Use
Your Enemies
Nº 12
John Keats
13
The Eve of St Agnes
John Keats
PenguinClassics
The Eve of
St Agnes
Nº 13
Thomas Hardy
14
Woman Much Missed
Thomas
Hardy
PenguinClassics
Woman
Much Missed
Nº 14
Guy de Maupassant
15
Femme Fatale
Guy de Maupassant
PenguinClassics
Femme
Fatale
Nº 15
Marco Polo
16
Travels in the Land of Serpents and Pearls
Marco Polo
PenguinClassics
Travels in the
Land of Serpents
and Pearls
Nº 16
Suetonius
17
Caligula
Suetonius
PenguinClassics
Caligula
Nº 17
Apollonius of Rhodes
18
Jason and Medea
Apollonius
of Rhodes
PenguinClassics
Jason
and Medea
Nº 18
Robert Louis Stevenson
19
Olalla
Robert
Louis
Stevenson
PenguinClassics
Olalla
Nº 19
& Friedrich Engels
20
The Communist  Manifesto
Karl Marx
&
Friedrich Engels
PenguinClassics
The Communist
Manifesto
Nº 20
Petronius
21
Trimalchio’s Feast
Petronius
PenguinClassics
Trimalchio’s
Feast
Nº 21
Johann Peter Hebel
22
How a Ghastly Story Was Brought to Light
Johann
Peter Hebel
PenguinClassics
How a Ghastly Story
Was Brought to Light by
a Common or Garden
Butcher’s Dog
Nº 22
Hans Christian Andersen
23
The Tinder Box
Hans
Christian
Andersen
PenguinClassics
The
Tinder
Box
Nº 23
Rudyard Kipling
24
The Gate of the Hundred Sorrows
Rudyard
Kipling
PenguinClassics
The Gate of
the Hundred
Sorrows
Nº 24
Dante
25
Circles of Hell
Dante
PenguinClassics
Circles
of Hell
Nº 25
Henry Mayhew
26
Of Street Piemen
Henry
Mayhew
PenguinClassics
Of Street
Piemen
Nº 26
Hafez
27
The nightingales are drunk
Hafez
PenguinClassics
The nightingales
are drunk
Nº 27
Geoffrey Chaucer
28
The Wife of Bath
Geoffrey
Chaucer
PenguinClassics
The Wife of Bath
Nº 28
Michel de Montaigne
29
How We Weep and Laugh at the Same Thing
Michel
de Montaigne
PenguinClassics
How We Weep
and Laugh at
the Same Thing
Nº 29
Thomas Nashe
30
The Terrors of the Night
Thomas
Nashe
PenguinClassics
The
Terrors
of the Night
Nº 30
Edgar Allan Poe
31
The Tell-Tale Heart
Edgar Allan
Poe
PenguinClassics
The
Tell-Tale Heart
Nº 31
Mary Kingsley
32
A Hippo Banquet
Mary
Kingsley
PenguinClassics
A Hippo
Banquet
Nº 32
Jane Austen
33
The Beautifull Cassandra
Jane
Austen
PenguinClassics
The
Beautifull
Cassandra
Nº 33
Anton Chekhov
34
Gooseberries
Anton
Chekhov
PenguinClassics
Gooseberries
Nº 34
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
35
Well, they are gone, and here must I remain
Samuel Taylor
Coleridge
PenguinClassics
Well, they are gone,
and here
must I remain
Nº 35
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
36
Sketchy, Doubtful, Incomplete Jottings
Johann Wolfgang
von Goethe
PenguinClassics
Sketchy, Doubtful,
Incomplete
Jottings
Nº 36
Charles Dickens
37
The Great Winglebury Duel
Charles
Dickens
PenguinClassics
The Great
Winglebury
Duel
Nº 37
Herman Melville
38
The Maldive Shark
Herman
Melville
PenguinClassics
The
Maldive
Shark
Nº 38
Elizabeth Gaskell
39
The Old Nurse’s Story
Elizabeth
Gaskell
PenguinClassics
The Old
Nurse’s Story
Nº 39
Nikolay Leskov
40
The Steel Flea
Nikolay
Leskov
PenguinClassics
The
Steel Flea
Nº 40
Honoré de Balzac
41
The Atheist’s Mass
Honoré de Balzac
PenguinClassics
The Atheist’s
Mass
Nº 41
Charlotte Perkins Gilman
42
The Yellow Wall-Paper
Charlotte
Perkins Gilman
PenguinClassics
The Yellow
Wall-Paper
Nº 42
C.P. Cavafy
43
Remember, Body...
C.P. Cavafy
PenguinClassics
Remember,
Body...
Nº 43
Fyodor Dostoevsky
44
The Meek One
Fyodor
Dostoevsky
PenguinClassics
The Meek One
Nº 44
Gustave Flaubert
45
A Simple Heart
Gustave
Flaubert
PenguinClassics
A Simple
Heart
Nº 45
Nikolai Gogol
46
The Nose
Nikolai
Gogol
PenguinClassics
The Nose
Nº 46
Samuel Pepys
47
The Great Fire of London
Samuel
Pepys
PenguinClassics
The
Great Fire
of London
Nº 47
Edith Wharton
48
The Reckoning
Edith
Wharton
PenguinClassics
The Reckoning
Nº 48
Henry James
49
The Figure in the Carpet
Henry
James
PenguinClassics
The Figure in
the Carpet
Nº 49
Wilfred Owen
50
Anthem for Doomed Youth
Wilfred
Owen
PenguinClassics
Anthem for
Doomed Youth
Nº 50
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
51
My Dearest Father
Wolfgang
Amadeus
Mozart
PenguinClassics
My Dearest
Father
Nº 51
Plato
52
Socrates’ Defence
Plato
PenguinClassics
Socrates’
Defence
Nº 52
Christina Rossetti
53
Goblin Market
Christina
Rossetti
PenguinClassics
Goblin
Market
Nº 53
Anon
54
Sindbad the Sailor
PenguinClassics
Sindbad
the Sailor
Nº 54
Sophocles
55
Antigone
Sophocles
PenguinClassics
Antigone
Nº 55
Ryūnosuke Akutagawa
56
The Life of a Stupid Man
Ryūnosuke
Akutagawa
PenguinClassics
The Life of
a Stupid Man
Nº 56
Leo Tolstoy
57
How Much Land  Does A Man Need?
Leo Tolstoy
PenguinClassics
How Much Land
Does A Man
Need?
Nº 57
Giorgio Vasari
58
Leonardo da Vinci
Giorgio
Vasari
PenguinClassics
Leonardo
da Vinci
Nº 58
Oscar Wilde
59
Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime
Oscar Wilde
PenguinClassics
Lord
Arthur Savile’s
Crime
Nº 59
Shen Fu
60
The Old Man of the Moon
Shen Fu
PenguinClassics
The
Old Man
of the Moon
Nº 60
Aesop
61
The Dolphins, the Whales and the Gudgeon
Aesop
PenguinClassics
The Dolphins,
the Whales and
the Gudgeon
Nº 61
Matsuo Bashō
62
Lips  too chilled
Matsuo Bashō
PenguinClassics
Lips too chilled
Nº 62
Emily Brontë
63
The Night is Darkening Round Me
Emily
Brontë
PenguinClassics
The Night
is Darkening
Round Me
Nº 63
Joseph Conrad
64
To-morrow
Joseph
Conrad
PenguinClassics
To-morrow
Nº 64
Richard Hakluyt
65
The Voyage of Sir Francis Drake Around the Whole Globe
Richard
Hakluyt
PenguinClassics
The Voyage of
Sir Francis Drake
Around the
Whole Globe
Nº 65
Kate Chopin
66
A Pair of Silk Stockings
Kate
Chopin
PenguinClassics
A Pair of
Silk Stockings
Nº 66
Charles Darwin
67
It was snowing butterflies
Charles
Darwin
PenguinClassics
It was snowing
butterflies
Nº 67
Brothers Grimm
68
The Robber Bridegroom
Brothers
Grimm
PenguinClassics
The Robber
Bridegroom
Nº 68
Catullus
69
I Hate and I Love
Catullus
PenguinClassics
I Hate
and
I Love
Nº 69
Homer
70
Circe and the Cyclops
Homer
PenguinClassics
Circe and
the Cyclops
Nº 70
D. H. Lawrence
71
Il Duro
D. H. Lawrence
PenguinClassics
Il Duro
Nº 71
Katherine Mansfield
72
Miss Brill
Katherine
Mansfield
PenguinClassics
Miss Brill
Nº 72
Ovid
73
The Fall of Icarus
Ovid
PenguinClassics
The Fall of
Icarus
Nº 73
Sappho
74
Come Close
Sappho
PenguinClassics
Come
Close
Nº 74
Ivan Turgenev
75
Kasyan from the Beautiful Lands
Ivan
Turgenev
PenguinClassics
Kasyan from the
Beautiful Lands
Nº 75
Virgil
76
O Cruel Alexis
Virgil
PenguinClassics
O Cruel
Alexis
Nº 76
H. G. Wells
77
A Slip under the Microscope
H. G. Wells
PenguinClassics
A Slip under
the Microscope
Nº 77
Herodotus
78
The Madness of Cambyses
Herodotus
PenguinClassics
The Madness
of Cambyses
Nº 78
Anon
79
Speaking of Śiva
PenguinClassics
Speaking
of Śiva
Nº 79
Anon
80
The Dhammapada
PenguinClassics
The
Dhammapada
Nº 80
Jane Austen
81
Lady Susan
Jane Austen
PenguinClassics
Lady Susan
Nº 81
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
82
The Body Politic
Jean-Jacques
Rousseau
PenguinClassics
The Body
Politic
Nº 82
Jean de la Fontaine
83
The World is Full of Foolish Men
Jean de la
Fontaine
PenguinClassics
The World
is Full of
Foolish Men
Nº 83
H.G. Wells
84
The Sea Raiders
H.G. Wells
PenguinClassics
The Sea Raiders
Nº 84
Livy
85
Hannibal
Livy
PenguinClassics
Hannibal
Nº 85
Charles Dickens
86
To Be Read at Dusk
Charles
Dickens
PenguinClassics
To Be Read
at Dusk
Nº 86
Leo Tolstoy
87
The Death of Ivan Ilyich
Leo Tolstoy
PenguinClassics
The Death of
Ivan Ilyich
Nº 87
Mark Twain
88
The Stolen White Elephant
Mark Twain
PenguinClassics
The Stolen
White Elephant
Nº 88
William Blake
89
Tyger, Tyger
William Blake
PenguinClassics
Tyger, Tyger
Nº 89
Sheridan Le Fanu
90
Green Tea
Sheridan Le Fanu
PenguinClassics
Green Tea
Nº 90
Various
91
The Yellow Book
PenguinClassics
The
Yellow Book
Nº 91
Olaudah Equiano
92
Kidnapped
Olaudah
Equiano
PenguinClassics
Kidnapped
Nº 92
Edgar Allan Poe
93
A Modern Detective
Edgar Allan
Poe
PenguinClassics
A Modern
Detective
Nº 93
Various
94
The Suffragettes
PenguinClassics
The Suffragettes
Nº 94
Margery Kempe
95
How To Be a Medieval Woman
Margery
Kempe
PenguinClassics
How To Be a
Medieval Woman
Nº 95
Joseph Conrad
96
Typhoon
Joseph
Conrad
PenguinClassics
Typhoon
Nº 96
Giacomo Casanova
97
The Nun of Murano
Giacomo
Casanova
PenguinClassics
The Nun of
Murano
Nº 97
W.B. Yeats
98
A terrible beauty is born
W.B. Yeats
PenguinClassics
A terrible
beauty is born
Nº 98
Thomas Hardy
99
The Withered Arm
Thomas
Hardy
PenguinClassics
The
Withered
Arm
Nº 99
Edward Lear
100
Nonsense
Edward Lear
PenguinClassics
Nonsense
Nº 100
Aristophanes
101
The Frogs
Aristophanes
PenguinClassics
The Frogs
Nº 101
Friedrich Nietzsche
102
Why I Am so Clever
Friedrich
Nietzsche
PenguinClassics
Why I Am
so Clever
Nº 102
Rainer Maria Rilke
103
Letters to a Young Poet
Rainer Maria
Rilke
PenguinClassics
Letters to
a Young Poet
Nº 103
Leonid Andreyev
104
Seven Hanged
Leonid
Andreyev
PenguinClassics
Seven
Hanged
Nº 104
Aphra Behn
105
Oroonoko
Aphra Behn
PenguinClassics
Oroonoko
Nº 105
Lewis Carroll
106
O frabjous day!
Lewis Carroll
PenguinClassics
O frabjous day!
Nº 106
John Gay
107
Trivia: or, the Art of Walking the Streets of London
John
Gay
PenguinClassics
Trivia:
or, the Art
of Walking the
Streets of London
Nº 107
E. T. A. Hoffmann
108
The Sandman
E. T. A.
Hoffmann
PenguinClassics
The
Sandman
Nº 108
Dante
109
Love that moves the sun and other stars
Dante
PenguinClassics
Love that moves
the sun and
other stars
Nº 109
Alexander Pushkin
110
The Queen of Spades
Alexander
Pushkin
PenguinClassics
The Queen
of Spades
Nº 110
Anton Chekhov
111
A Nervous Breakdown
Anton
Chekhov
PenguinClassics
A Nervous
Breakdown
Nº 111
Kakuzo Okakura
112
The Book of Tea
Kakuzo
Okakura
PenguinClassics
The Book
of Tea
Nº 112
William Shakespeare
113
Is this a dagger which I see before me?
William
Shakespeare
PenguinClassics
Is this a dagger
which I see
before me?
Nº 113
Emily Dickinson
114
My life had stood a loaded gun
Emily
Dickinson
PenguinClassics
My life had
stood a
loaded gun
Nº 114
Longus
115
Daphnis and Chloe
Longus
PenguinClassics
Daphnis
and Chloe
Nº 115
Mary Shelley
116
Matilda
Mary Shelley
PenguinClassics
Matilda
Nº 116
George Eliot
117
The Lifted Veil
George Eliot
PenguinClassics
The Lifted Veil
Nº 117
Fyodor Dostoyevsky
118
White Nights
Fyodor
Dostoyevsky
PenguinClassics
White
Nights
Nº 118
Oscar Wilde
119
Only Dull People Are Brilliant at Breakfast
Oscar Wilde
PenguinClassics
Only Dull People
Are Brilliant at
Breakfast
Nº 119
Virginia Woolf
120
Flush
Virginia
Woolf
PenguinClassics
Flush
Nº 120
Arthur Conan Doyle
121
Lot Nº 249
Arthur
Conan Doyle
PenguinClassics
Lot Nº 249
Nº 121
Benedict of Nursia
122
The Rule of Benedict
PenguinClassics
The Rule of
Benedict
Nº 122
Washington Irving
123
Rip Van Winkle
Washington
Irving
PenguinClassics
Rip Van
Winkle
Nº 123
Anon
124
Anecdotes of the Cynics
PenguinClassics
Anecdotes of
the Cynics
Nº 124
Victor Hugo
125
Waterloo
Victor Hugo
PenguinClassics
Waterloo
Nº 125
Charlotte Brontë
126
Stancliffe’s Hotel
Charlotte
Brontë
PenguinClassics
Stancliffe’s
Hotel
Nº 126
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